Nutrition Basics

Vitamins and Minerals

Food Substitutes

Healthy Eating

Eating for Disease Management

Special Considerations

Children and Nutrition

Nutrition During Pregnancy

Nutritional Concerns for the Older Adult

The Weight Loss Links

What Diets Can I Use to Lose Weight?

Eating Disorders

Food Safety

Modern Food Trends

Nutrition Index







We are a safe place to discuss your personal health issues.


Sign up for free!



  Login:

  Password:



Sign up for free email!


Using a Home Blood Pressure Monitor
Using a Home Blood Pressure Monitor


(More Video)

Online learning resources for diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and nutrition.
Diabetes 101: Learn more about diabetes, managing your blood sugar levels, and your diet.
Diabetes 201: Learn more about diabetes, managing your blood sugars, and your diet.
Asthma 101: Learn more about asthma and dealing with shortness of breath.
Hypertension 101: Learn more about hypertension and managing your blood pressure.
Nutrition 101: Learn more about improving your nutrition and diet

"Life is a series of experiences, each one of which makes us bigger, even though it is hard to realize this. For the world was built to develop character, and we must learn that the setbacks and grieves which we endure help us in our marching onward."
~Henry Ford

Help me learn about:
Google
Web savvyhealth.com

We welcome all suggestions. Please tell us how to make savvyHEALTH even better.


Nutrition Library: Nutrition Basics

What is a healthy Diet?



Eat a variety of foods

To obtain the nutrients and other substances needed for good health, vary the foods you eat.

Foods contain combinations of nutrients and other healthful substances. No single food can supply all nutrients in the amounts you need. For example, oranges provide vitamin C but no vitamin B12. Cheese provides vitamin B12 but no vitamin C. To make sure you get all of the nutrients needed for health, choose the recommended number of daily servings from each of the food groups displayed in the Food Guide Pyramid.

[Link to Food Pyramid] "Consumer Information Ceter"

Use foods from the base of the Food Pyramid as the foundation of your meals

Americans do choose a wide variety of foods. However, people often choose higher or lower amounts from some food groups than suggested in the Food Guide Pyramid. The Pyramid shows that foods from the grain products group, along with vegetables and fruits, are the basis of healthful diets. Enjoy meals that have rice, pasta, potatoes, or bread at the center of the plate, accompanied by other vegetables and fruit, and lean and low-fat foods from the other groups. Limit fats and sugars added in food preparation and at the table. Compare the recommended number of servings in box 1 with what you usually eat.

You can achieve a healthful, nutritious eating pattern with many combinations of foods from the five major food groups. Choosing a variety of foods within and across food groups improves dietary patterns because foods within the same group have different combinations of nutrients and other beneficial substances. For example, some vegetables and fruits are good sources of vitamin C or vitamin A, while others are high in folate; still others are good sources of calcium or iron. Choosing a variety of foods within each group also helps to make your meals more interesting from day to day.

What about vegetarian diets?

Some Americans eat vegetarian diets for reasons of culture, belief, or health. Most vegetarians eat milk products and eggs, and as a group, these lacto-ovo-vegetarians enjoy excellent health. Vegetarian diets are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and can meet Recommended Dietary Allowances for nutrients. You can get enough protein from a vegetarian diet as long as the variety and amounts of foods consumed are adequate. Meat, fish, and poultry are major contributors of iron, zinc, and B vitamins in most American diets, and vegetarians should pay special attention to these nutrients.

Vegans eat only food of plant origin. Because animal products are the only food sources of vitamin B12, vegans must supplement their diets with a source of this vitamin. In addition, vegan diets, particularly those of children, require care to ensure adequacy of vitamin D and calcium, which most Americans obtain from milk products.

Foods vary in calorie and fat value

Some foods such as grain products, vegetables, and fruits have many nutrients and other healthful substances but are relatively low in calories. Fat and alcohol are high in calories.

Children, teenagers and women have increased calcium needs

Many women and adolescent girls need to eat more calcium-rich foods to get the calcium needed for healthy bones throughout life. By selecting low-fat or fat-free milk products and other low-fat calcium sources, they can obtain adequate calcium and keep fat intake from being too high. Young children, teenage girls, and women of childbearing age should also eat enough iron-rich foods, such as lean meats and whole-grain or enriched white bread, to keep the body's iron stores at adequate levels.

(Reprinted with permission from United States General Services Administration)





Copyright © 2000-2022 savvyHEALTH.com. All rights reserved.





About savvyHEALTH | Privacy | Feedback | Home

http://www.savvyHEALTH.com/

All contents copyright © 1999-2022 savvyHEALTH, Inc. All rights reserved.

This internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health, you should always consult with a physician or other healthcare professional. Please review the Terms of Use before using this site. Your use of the site indicates your agreement to be bound by the Terms of Use.