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Using an Asthma Nebulizer
Using an Asthma Nebulizer


(More Video)

Online learning resources for diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and nutrition.
Diabetes 101: Learn more about diabetes, managing your blood sugar levels, and your diet.
Diabetes 201: Learn more about diabetes, managing your blood sugars, and your diet.
Asthma 101: Learn more about asthma and dealing with shortness of breath.
Hypertension 101: Learn more about hypertension and managing your blood pressure.
Nutrition 101: Learn more about improving your nutrition and diet

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Nutrition Library: The Weight Loss Links

What is a Good Weight for Me



Who Should Lose Weight?

Doctors generally agree that people who are 20 percent or more overweight, especially the severely obese person, can gain significant health benefits from weight loss.

What is Your Risk?

1. Body Mass Index (BMI)
Use the BMI calculator or tables to estimate your total body fat. The BMI score means the following:
Link to BMI calculator in nutrition tool]

BMI

Underweight

Below 18.5
Normal 18.5 - 24.9
Overweight 25.0 - 29.9
Obesity 30.0 and Above

2. Waist Circumference
Determine your waist circumference by placing a measuring tape snugly around your waist. It is a good indicator of your abdominal fat which is another predictor of your risk for developing risk factors for heart disease and other diseases. This risk increases with a waist measurement of over 40 inches in men and over 35 inches in women

3. Other Risk Factors
Besides being overweight or obese, there are additional risk factors to consider.

RISK FACTORS

  • high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • high LDL-cholesterol ("bad" cholesterol)
  • low HDL-cholesterol ("good" cholesterol)
  • high triglycerides
  • high blood glucose (sugar)
  • family history of premature heart disease
  • physical inactivity
  • cigarette smoking

4. Assessment
For people who are considered obese (BMI greater than or equal to 30) or those who are overweight (BMI of 25 to 29.9) and have two or more risk factors, the guidelines recommend weight loss. Even a small weight loss (just 10 percent of your current weight) will help to lower your risk of developing diseases associated with obesity. Patients who are overweight, do not have a high waist measurement, and have less than 2 risk factors may need to prevent further weight gain rather than lose weight.

Reprinted with permission from the National Institutes of Health





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